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House price growth rose by 3.7% in April

Annual house price growth rose to 3.7% in April 2020, up from 3% in March, Nationwide’s House Price Index has found.

Monthly prices rose by 0.7% to £222,915, as Nationwide said the impact of the pandemic is not fully captured by the data.

Robert Gardner, Nationwide’s chief economist, said: “In the opening months of 2020, before the pandemic struck the UK, the housing market had been steadily gathering momentum. Activity levels and price growth were edging up thanks to continued robust labour market conditions, low borrowing costs and a more stable political backdrop following the general election.

“But housing market activity is now grinding to a halt as a result of the measures implemented to control the spread of the virus, and where the government has recommended not entering into housing transactions during this period.”

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He added: “The medium-term outlook for the housing market is also highly uncertain, where much will depend on the performance of the wider economy.

“Economic activity is set to contract significantly in the near term as a direct result of the necessary measures adopted to suppress the spread of the virus.

“But the raft of policies adopted to support the economy, including to protect businesses and jobs, to support peoples’ incomes and keep borrowing costs down, should set the stage for a rebound once the shock passes, and help limit long-term damage to the economy.

“These same measures should also help ensure the impact on the housing market will ultimately be much less than would normally be associated with an economic shock of this magnitude.”

Tomer Aboody, director of property lender MT Finance, said: “Nationwide portrays a confident housing market with the fastest rate of growth in prices since February 2017. Of course, lockdown will affect sales and prices, but that is the reason – people are locked down, surveyors cannot value properties and would-be buyers can’t view them.

“There is still huge demand for property and buyers are confident about the market, which wasn’t the case in 2008. Then, the financial system was devastated; this time, lending isn’t an issue and banks remain keen to lend.

“There will be the inevitable slowdown of transactions but once lockdown has been lifted, huge pent-up demand which should take the marker back up.”

Miles Robinson, Head of Mortgages at online mortgage broker Trussle, said: “The Land Registry data released this week shows that property sales collapsed by 40% during March, which is perhaps a more representative picture of how the Coronavirus is beginning to affect the housing market.

“However, we have seen lenders that had previously hiked LTV thresholds at the beginning of lockdown begin to loosen restrictions and, with the COVID-19 exit plan due to be published next week, we could see the market start to shift back into action.”

BY RYAN BEMBRIDGE

Source: Property Wire

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Harlow in Essex leads the way on 10-year house price growth

In the past decade Harlow in Essex has recorded the highest house price growth, CashLady analysis of Land Registry data has found.

Over the period prices have risen by 74.92% in Harlow, followed by Southend-on-Sea (74.85%), Watford (74.75%), Thurrock (73.20%) and Cambridge (73.03%).

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In December 2019 prices in Harlow averaged at £290,068, up from £165,829 a decade before.

If prices continued to rise at the same rate they would reach £507,387 by 2030.

At the other end of the spectrum Aards and North Down in Northern Ireland saw prices fall by 7.73% in 10 years, followed by Aberdeen (-7.47%), Inverclyde (-5.81%) Mid and East Antrim (-5.32%) and County Durham (-5.18%).

BY RYAN BEMBRIDGE

Source: Property Wire

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Halifax: House prices up 2.8% annually

House prices increased by 2.8% in the year to February, according to Halifax’s house price index.

On a monthly basis, house prices increased by 0.3%.

Looking at the data on a quarterly basis, house prices rose by 2.9%.

Russell Galley, managing director, Halifax, said: “The UK housing market has remained steady heading into early spring.

“Much like we saw in January, the increases seen in February reflect the continued improvement of key market indicators.

“The sustained level of buyer and seller activity is strong compared to recent years, with positive employment conditions and a competitive mortgage market continuing to support demand.

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“Looking ahead, there are a number of risks, including the potential impact of coronavirus, which continue to exert pressure on the economy, and we wait to see how these will affect housing market sentiment later in the year.”

Ben Johnston, director of off-market property app Houso, added: “House prices are on a continued upwards trajectory, but it remains to be seen how much of an impact the unexpected hurdle of Coronavirus is going to have on the market.

“The Bank of England could feasibly follow the Federal Reserve with a rate cut to help markets and shore up the stagnating economy in an effort to prevent other businesses going the way of FlyBe.

“Next week’s Budget gives the government the chance to stimulate growth further by reducing stamp duty although this might not be enough until the Coronavirus has stabilised and the threat has diminished.

“That all-too-precious confidence, which is so important for the market, is hanging in the balance.”

Lucy Pendleton, founder director, James Pendleton, said: “It’s no surprise to see continued healthy price growth like this. Demand and supply have both been rebounding recently but, so far, the number of new buyers is definitely outpacing the return of sellers.

“Coronavirus impacted our business for the first time on Wednesday, stealing away a sale that was just days from exchanging.

“The buyer worked in the events industry which is being rocked by large numbers of cancellations. He was unfortunately one of the employees told his job was at risk, forcing him to pull out of the purchase completely. The hope is this will remain an isolated case, but the impact of the virus will become clearer in March.

“For now, with valuations still rising and competition for certain properties still fierce, buyers have begun to put in offers on multiple properties in a bid to secure an option before stalling over exchange of contracts in case something better comes along. This could create an unappealing log jam and put more completions at risk if Covid-19 starts to become a major factor.

“Despite the newspaper and TV screens being peppered with images of people wearing face masks and plastic bottles on their heads, there’s still a huge appetite to move, and buyers and vendors have so far refused to put their searches on hold.”

By Jake Carter

Source: Mortgage Introducer