Marketing No Comments

West Midlands house prices up 7.6pc in a year

Across the UK, the average house price was £232,134, Nationwide Building Society said.

This was a 5.7 per cent increase compared with a year earlier.

The West Midlands saw the second highest rise of any region in England at 7.6 per cent to £208,806.

Robert Gardner, Nationwide’s chief economist, said: “The slowdown in March probably reflects a softening of demand ahead of the original end of the stamp duty holiday before the Chancellor announced the extension in the Budget.”

The stamp duty holiday had been due to end on March 31, but was extended in the recent Budget.

To find out more about how we can assist you with your Mortgage requirements, please click here to get in touch

Mr Gardner continued: “The longer-term outlook remains highly uncertain. It may be that the recovery continues to gather momentum and that shifts in housing demand resulting from the pandemic continue to lift the market.

“However, if the labour market weakens towards the end of the year as policy support is withdrawn, as most analysts expect, then activity is likely to slow nearer the end of 2021, perhaps sharply.”

Nationwide also released figures showing house price growth across the UK’s nations and regions in the first quarter of 2021.

Mr Gardner said: “The North West was the strongest-performing region, with prices up 8.2 per cent year on year. This is the strongest price growth seen in the region since 2005 and average prices reached a record high of £181,999.”

London was the weakest-performing region in the first quarter of 2021, with house prices increasing by 4.8 per cent, softening from 6.2 per cent annual growth in the previous quarter.

Read about the UK Housing Market via our Specialist Residential & Buy to Let Division

Mr Gardner added: “The South West was the only southern region to see an acceleration in annual price growth, which picked up to 7.2 per cent in quarter one, from 6.6 per cent in quarter four of 2020.”

Tomer Aboody, director of property lender MT Finance, said: “The continued shift in buyers’ demands for more space meant London saw the slowest growth, with prices still very high compared to the rest of the country and space more limited.

“Gardens, communities, green spaces and easy commutes are increasing demand for the outer regions, with prices continuing to rise to reflect this.”

By John Corser

Source: Express & Star

Discover our Mortgage Broker services.

Marketing No Comments

London house prices to boom over the next five years

London house prices are set to boom over the next five years, estate agent Savills said as it upped its UK property market forecasts for 2021.

House prices in London’s mainstream market are expected to rise 12.6 per cent in the five years ended 2025, the real estate firm said.

Meanwhile prime central London house prices are rated a “buy” as they are down 21 per cent from peak, and are expected to “rebound strongly”.

Prime central London prices will rise three per cent this year, seven per cent next year and total 21.6 per cent by 2025.

To find out more about how we can assist you with your Mortgage requirements, please click here to get in touch

Savills upgraded its UK house price forecasts for this year to growth of four per cent, compared to its previous expectation that property values would remain flat in 2021.

Over the five years to the end of 2025, it anticipates UK-wide house price growth with total 21.1 per cent.

Housing transactions are expected to reach highs of 1.4m this year before falling back to pre-Covid levels in 2023.

Read about the UK Housing Market via our Specialist Residential & Buy to Let Division

However, markets furthest from the capital are expected to see the strongest growth, with the north west and Yorkshire and The Humber leading the way.

“2021 is going to be a complex and uneven year, with competing forces impacting the housing market at different points,” Lucian Cook, Savills head of residential research, said.

“But the outlook has improved since the beginning of the year given the speed of the vaccination programme, the expected relaxation of social distancing measures and government support for both jobs and the housing market.

By Jessica Clark

Source: City AM

Discover our Mortgage Broker services.

Marketing No Comments

House prices record surprise jump despite looming stamp duty deadline

UK house prices recorded a surprise jump this month as buyers were undeterred by the looming stamp duty holiday deadline.

After three consecutive monthly falls the average price of property coming to market increased 0.5 per cent – or £1,511 – this month.

The number of new buyers has continued to grow despite the fact that it is now too late for most to beat the stamp duty deadline of 31 March.

Meanwhile, one in five buyers who agreed a purchase in July last year have still not completed, with an estimated 100,000 buyers still likely to miss out on their expected tax saving, according to Rightmove data.

To find out more about how we can assist you with your Mortgage requirements, please click here to get in touch

High demand is also outstripping supply and pushing up house prices. New seller numbers are down 21 per cent on the previous year as family home owners delay coming to the market, with experts suggesting it could be due to homeschooling distractions.

Tim Bannister, Rightmove’s director of property data, said: “Last year the market was unexpectedly buoyed by buyers’ determination to move and satisfy their new lockdown-induced housing needs.

“We may well be seeing a continuation of that this year. Rightmove’s early 2021 buyer data shows that despite the imminent end of the stamp duty incentive, all of the key buyer metrics are ahead of early 2020, itself an active period as the market was boosted by the post-election ‘Boris bounce’.

Read about the UK Housing Market via our Specialist Residential & Buy to Let Division

“As well as the current lockdown motivating buyer demand again, the restrictions have also been a factor in limiting new supply, leading to some modest upwards price pressure. These are strong signs that new buyer demand is not facing a cliff-edge after the 31st of March.

“It remains to be seen if this momentum will be enough to make up for the removal of the stamp duty savings that are benefitting many buyers and have been adding a sense of urgency to the whole market.”

By Jessica Clark

Source: City AM

Discover our Mortgage Broker services.

Marketing No Comments

New research suggests house prices could rise 17% in next decade

House prices in the UK are expected to rise by 17% in the next 10 years, according to data collected by Good Move.

The firm looked to the rise in property prices over the last 40 years to predict future prices.

According to data from the government website, average house prices in the UK rose from £19,273 in 1980 to £239,927 in 2020, representing a 1145% increase.

Looking to 2030, the data shows that average property prices are predicted to reach £279,641.

To find out more about how we can assist you with your Mortgage requirements, please click here to get in touch

Furthermore, Good Move expects average house prices to reach £392,301 in 2050.

Nima Ghasri, director at Good Move, said: “This year, house prices in the UK have increased at an unprecedented rate, increasing by 26% compared to 2015 and 7% compared to 2019.

“House prices have been a huge talking point in the industry this past year, and we wanted to see what we could come to expect if they continue to rise at the same rate as they have since 1980. That’s why we conducted this research.

Read about the UK Housing Market via our Specialist Residential & Buy to Let Division

“If our predictions are correct, we can expect house prices to soar in the future, nearly reaching an eyewatering £400,000 by 2025.

“However, many things impact house prices, and nobody can predict for certain what the economy and property market might look like in the future, so this doesn’t mean that our predictions are correct.

“Still, it’s interesting to see what we could expect in the UK if house prices follow in the footsteps of the past.”

By Jake Carter

Source: Mortgage Introducer

Discover our Mortgage Broker services.

Marketing No Comments

House prices have doubled over the past decade

Average house prices have increased by 51% over the past 10 years, according to e.surv’s Chartered Surveyors House Price Index.

On a monthly basis, house prices across England and Wales increased by 1.4% between November and December 2020.

Throughout 2020, house prices rose by 7.8% despite the added complications of COVID-19.

This is the highest annual increase since 2016, however the majority of growth took place in the last six months of the year as pent-up demand was released by more relaxed coronavirus restrictions.

As a result, the average house price in England and Wales was £326,762 at the end of December.

To find out more about how we can assist you with your Mortgage requirements, please click here to get in touch

Richard Sexton, director at e.surv, said: “During 2020, large numbers of people across the UK were confined to their houses for long periods of time, as we battled the pandemic.

“Over the year many people were forced to adapt their homes to function as offices, schools and nurseries.

“This increased emphasis on where we live and where we spend so much of our lives undoubtedly helped focus many people’s minds on the property market.

“This increased focus was reflected in the types of property that were most sought after in 2020.

Read about the UK Housing Market via our Specialist Residential & Buy to Let Division

“Larger, typically more expensive, properties with more outdoor space became even more highly prized, which in turn increased the price of the average transaction.

“It’s important to remember that the pandemic which produced such an unusual year is very much still with us.

“Everyone involved in the property market must continue to operate in a responsible manner, making use of technology where possible to support the industry while putting safety first.”

By Jake Carter

Source: Mortgage Introducer

Discover our Mortgage Broker services.

Marketing No Comments

First-time buyers losing interest in city living

City living is losing its appeal among first-time buyers, with the vast majority now preferring more subdued locations, Trussle has found.

As it stands just 29% of first-time buyers plan to buy in a city, compared to 53% in a suburb.

Miles Robinson, head of mortgages at online mortgage broker Trussle, said: “The pandemic has increased the financial pressure many first-time buyers were already feeling, as well as creating a seismic shift in what people expect from their home.

To find out more about how we can assist you with your Mortgage requirements, please click here to get in touch

“As a result, financial pressures and rising house prices, alongside a desire for more outdoor space, means demand in more affordable rural locations is currently outpacing that for urban destinations.

“But lenders are starting to return to the market with higher LTV products, which could make more expensive homes in the city more accessible again.

“And, we may see renewed interest in city living once the vaccine has been rolled out and things begin to return to normality.

Read about the UK Housing Market via our Specialist Residential & Buy to Let Division

“As such, only time will tell if the current lust for country properties is a long-term trend or more of a spontaneous response.”

Higher house prices in urban locations are likely to play a huge factor in this trend, with 65% saying it’s ‘impossible’ to get on the housing ladder.

The research found that the average budget for a first home was £174,266.

BY RYAN BEMBRIDGE

Source: Property Wire

Discover our Mortgage Broker services.

Marketing No Comments

House prices rose at twice the rate of flats in 2020

The rate at which the price of houses is rising is more than double that for flats as lockdown-weary Britons look for more space.

Annual property price growth for houses in the UK is currently running at 4.3%, while price growth for flats is just 1.8%, according to our latest House Price Index.

The trend is being seen across the country, with all regions reporting significantly stronger increases in the value of houses than those of flats.

Richard Donnell, our director of research and insight, said: “The search for space has been a key feature of the rebound in market activity as households re-evaluate their housing requirements.

“Demand for family homes with gardens, parking and extra space to work from home has continued to rise.”

To find out more about how we can assist you with your Mortgage requirements, please click here to get in touch

Why is this happening?

The coronavirus pandemic triggered a ‘once-in-a-lifetime reassessment of housing’ in 2019, as lockdowns and social distancing created a greater appetite for home offices and outdoor space.

Analysis of our advanced search property tool over the past 12 months found that ‘garden’ was the top feature buyers looked for, while ‘detached’, ‘rural’ and ‘secluded’ all also made it into the top 10.

The high level of demand for houses is putting upward pressure on prices, as demand outstrips supply.

By contrast, flats are suddenly in less demand than they were before the pandemic, leading to slower price growth.

Who does it affect?

The rise in the value of houses was strongest in Wales, followed by the North West and Yorkshire and the Humber, all regions in which affordability is less of a barrier to price growth.

By contrast, the price of flats was broadly unchanged year-on-year in the East, while they edged ahead by less than 1% in the West Midlands and the South West.

The current trend could make it harder for sellers trying to trade up the property ladder from a flat to a house. This is because they are not only likely to find their current property takes longer to sell, but they will also face increased competition for their next home and an enlarged gap between the price of the two properties, if they are staying in the same region.

Read about the UK Housing Market via our Specialist Residential & Buy to Let Division

What’s the background?

The quest for more space has contributed to a shift in the demographic profile of home movers, and there has been a notable increase in sales in more affluent demographics, where house prices are typically higher.

This shift, along with a high level of transactions, has contributed to a 26% rise in the value of property that changed hands in 2020, with sales rising by £62 billion to £300 billion.

Moving into 2021, older, equity rich, long-time homeowners are expected to continue to take a growing share of sales.

Top three takeaways

  • The rate at which the price of houses is rising is more than double that for flats as lockdown-weary Britons look for more space
  • Annual property price growth for houses in the UK is currently running at 4.3%, while price growth for flats is just 1.8
  • The trend is being see across the country, with all regions reporting significantly stronger increases in the value of houses than those of flats.

By Nicky Burridge

Source: Zoopla

Discover our Mortgage Broker services.

Marketing No Comments

House Prices At Record High But Headwinds Expected

Average UK house price reached new record high in October although the market looks set to slow in the coming months, reported Halifax in its latest House Price Index, published this week

‘The average UK house price now tops a quarter of a million pounds (£250,457) for the first time in history, as annual house price inflation rose to 7.5 per cent in October, its highest rate since mid-2016’, said Halifax, said Halifax managing director Russell Galley. ‘Underlying the pace of recent price growth in the market is the 5.3 per cent gain over the past four months, the strongest since 2006. However, month-on-month price growth slowed considerably, down to just 0.3 per cent compared to 1.5 per cent in September.

To find out more about how we can assist you with your Mortgage requirements, please click here to get in touch

‘Overall we saw a broad continuation of recent trends with the market still predominantly being driven by home-mover demand for larger houses. Since March flat prices are up by 2.0 per cent compared to a 6.0 per cent increase for a typical detached property. In cash terms that equates to a £2,883 increase for flats compared to a £27,371 rise for detached houses’.

Latest figures put home-buyer mortgage approvals at their highest level since 2007, ‘as transaction levels continue to be supercharged by pent-up demand’, said Galley.

Government support measures have helped to delay an expected downturn in the housing market but ‘they will not continue indefinitely’.

The macroeconomic landscape in the UK remains highly uncertain, said Galley. ‘With a number of clear headwinds facing the housing market, we expect to see greater downward pressure on house prices as we move into 2021’.

Read about the UK Housing Market via our Specialist Residential & Buy to Let Division

Halifax figures mirror those of Nationwide which put October house price growth at 5.8 per cent, and monthly rises of 0.8 per cent.

The annual rate of increase was the highest recorded by Nationwide since January 2015, said its chief economist Robert Gardner.

But, he added, ‘data suggests that the economic recovery has lost momentum in recent months with economic growth slowing sharply to 2.1 per cent in August, down from 6.4 per cent in July.

‘The outlook remains highly uncertain and will depend heavily on how the pandemic and the measures to contain it evolve as well as the efficacy of policy measures implemented to limit the damage to the wider economy’.

Source: Residential Landlord

Discover our Mortgage Broker services.

Marketing No Comments

House price inflation surges to 7.5% in October

House prices rose by 7.5% year-on-year in October due to strong demand for higher value homes, Halifax’s House Price Index has found.

Quarterly prices increased by a substantial 4.0%, bringing the average price to £250,457 across the UK.

However, month-on-month price growth slowed considerably, down to 0.3% compared to 1.5% in September.

Russell Galley, managing director, Halifax, said: “Overall we saw a broad continuation of recent trends with the market still predominantly being driven by home-mover demand for larger houses.

To find out more about how we can assist you with your Mortgage requirements, please click here to get in touch

“Since March flat prices are up by 2.0% compared to a 6.0% increase for a typical detached property. In cash terms that equates to a £2,883 increase for flats compared to a £27,371 rise for detached houses.

“This level of price inflation is underpinned by unusually high levels of demand, with latest industry figures showing home-buyer mortgage approvals at their highest level since 2007, as transaction levels continue to be supercharged by pent-up demand as a result of the spring/summer lockdown, as well as the Chancellor’s waiver on stamp duty for properties up to £500,000.

“While government support measures have undoubtedly helped to delay the expected downturn in the housing market, they will not continue indefinitely and, as we move through autumn and into winter, the macroeconomic landscape in the UK remains highly uncertain.

Read about the UK Housing Market via our Specialist Residential & Buy to Let Division

“Though the renewed lockdown is set to be less restrictive than earlier this year, it bears out that the country’s struggle with COVID-19 is far from over.

“With a number of clear headwinds facing the housing market, we expect to see greater downward pressure on house prices as we move into 2021.”

Jamie Johnson, chief executive of FJP Investment, said: “The property market is moving from strength to strength. Amidst the uncertainty, buyer demand for bricks and mortar is pushing prices to record highs.

“Yet with the country now in a second lockdown, is this momentum about to suddenly run out? I don’t believe so. After all, the stamp duty holiday is still in play and the government has confirmed buyers and renters can still move houses throughout November. Clearly, it understands the importance of the property market in supporting the economy.

“I anticipate the rate of house price growth to slow down in November, however it will no doubt continue to remain in positive territory. People are clearly looking to invest in safe and secure assets during in this uncertain climate, and real estate has a proven track record of being resilient and quickly recovering from period of market volatility.”

BY RYAN BEMBRIDGE

Source: Property Wire

Discover our Mortgage Broker services.

Marketing No Comments

House Price Trend Continues Upwards

House prices increased by 2 per cent in September, according to the latest Nationwide index. This pushed up the annual rate of house price growth to 5.0 per cent, the highest rate since Sep 2016.

Commenting on the figures, Robert Gardner, Nationwide’s Chief Economist, said:

‘Housing market activity has recovered strongly in recent months’, said Nationwide chief economist Robert Gardner. ‘Mortgage approvals for house purchase rose from around 66,000 in July to almost 85,000 in August – the highest since 2007, well above the monthly average of 66,000 prevailing in 2019.

‘The rebound reflects a number of factors. Pent-up demand is coming through, with decisions taken to move before lockdown now progressing. The stamp duty holiday is adding to momentum by bringing purchases forward. Behavioural shifts may also be boosting activity as people reassess their housing needs and preferences as a result of life in lockdown’.

To find out more about how we can assist you with your Mortgage requirements, please click here to get in touch

Nationwide said its recent research indicated that, of the people who had been considering a move before the Coronavirus Crisis, a fifth had put their plans on hold – a quarter of these saying they had concerns about the property market.

‘Younger people were much more likely to have put off plans than older people, which may reflect concerns about employment prospects’, said Gardner.

‘Indeed, most forecasters expect labour market conditions to weaken significantly in the quarters ahead as tighter restrictions dampen economic activity and the furlough scheme winds down. While the recently announced jobs support scheme will provide some assistance, it is not as comprehensive as the furlough scheme it replaces’.

Of those moving or considering a move, around a third were looking to move to a different area, while nearly 30 per cent were doing so to access a garden or outdoor space more easily.

‘As you might expect, the majority of people are looking to move to less urban areas, with this trend becoming increasingly evident among older age cohorts’, said Gardner.

Source: Residential Landlord